Main page content begins here

Here are some frequently asked questions about Animal Care & Control in Edmonton.

FAQ

What complaints will Animal Care & Control Officers investigate?

Animal Control Peace Officers typically investigate complaints of:

  • Excessive barking
  • Dog bites or attacks
  • Pets without a licence
  • Dogs or cats at large
  • Failure to clean up pet defecation (poop)
  • Problem wildlife
  • Dead animals on public property

The City of Edmonton Animal Control Peace Officers also now enforce the Provincial Animal Protection Act (APA) which enables the officers to respond to animals in distress or animals that have been abandoned. The Act was previously enforced by the Edmonton Humane Society (EHS).

How are pet-related complaints investigated?

Animal Control Peace Officers investigate complaints by interviewing witnesses, neighbours, complainants and pet owners. When possible, the officer also collects other evidence.

Any investigation can result in a simple warning, a fine or a mandatory court appearance.

What is a mandatory court appearance?

Animal Control Peace Officers can issue a ticket that requires a pet owner to appear in Provincial Court.

This option is used in cases where owners have received multiple fines for repeat offences, such as a barking dog or dog at-large, and for extreme instances such as serious dog attacks. The Provincial Court can issue higher fines and can even order the City to seize an animal from an owner.

Animal Control Peace Officers can also now enforce the Animal Protection Act (APA) which deals with concerns of animal abuse, neglect and abandonment. In severe cases, animals may be seized and/or criminal charges laid.

When can an Animal Control Peace Officer seize an animal?

Animal Control Peace Officers can seize animals that are found at-large (for example, stray) within Edmonton city limits or animals that the Provincial Court has ordered them to seize. They can also seize animals under the Provincial Animal Protection Act (APA).

Animals seized for being at-large can be picked up by their owner from the Animal Care & Control Centre at 13550 163 Street.

Do Animal Control Peace Officers always seize at-large animals?

No. Under the City’s Free Ride Home program, at-large pets with a valid pet licence can be taken directly home by an officer free of charge once every 12 months.

Who should I call if an animal is being abused or neglected?

The City of Edmonton Animal Control Peace Officers now enforce the Provincial Animal Protection Act (APA) in Edmonton. The APA enables the City of Edmonton's Animal Control Peace Officers to respond to complaints of animals in distress or animals that have been abandoned. The Act was previously enforced by the Edmonton Humane Society (EHS). 

What are the possible fines for violating Edmonton’s Animal Control Bylaw or the Animal Protection Act?

Common fines under the Animal Licensing and Control Bylaw are:

  • Excessive barking - $100
  • Owning an unlicensed pet - $250
  • Animal at-large - $100
  • Failure to remove defecation - $100
  • Failure to control or leash a dog - $100
  • Dog attack causing no injury - $100
  • Dog attack causing injury - $500 to $2,500

The penalties for non-compliance with the Animal Protection Act may include monetary penalties up to a maximum of $20,000, prohibition of animal ownership for a period determined by the courts and any other terms and conditions a court deems appropriate

What should I do if I have an unwanted cat on my property?

Animal Care & Control Officers do not capture at-large cats because they are generally not a danger to humans. However, stray and at-large cats can be brought to the Animal Care & Control Centre if you trap them humanely.

For information, visit Unwanted Cats on Private Property.

How long are animals kept at the Animal Care & Control Centre?

Animals with no identification are kept up to three business days and animals with identification are kept up to 10 business days.

After that, adoptable animals are transferred to the
Edmonton Humane Society and other rescue groups.

What does the City do to find a lost pet's owner?

Every animal that enters our Animal Care & Control Centre is searched for tags, a tattoo or a microchip.

When an animal has a valid pet licence and is wearing tags, we can immediately contact the owner. A tattoo or microchip with up-to-date information on file also helps us to contact the owner.

Every animal that enters our facility also has its picture posted on our Found Pets search tool.

How many animals go through the Animal Care & Control Centre each year?

On average, the Animal Service Facility sees more than 6,000 animals per year.

In 2015, we reunited 1,797 dogs with their owners and sent 528 to the Edmonton Humane Society and other rescue groups for adoption.

We also reunited 515 cats with their owners and sent 2,080 to the Edmonton Humane Society and other rescue groups for adoption.

How do I get to the Animal Care & Control Centre?

The Animal Care & Control Centre is located at 13550 -163 Street, and shares its entrance with the Chappelle Centre for Animal Care, home of the Edmonton Humane Society.

When travelling westbound on 137 Avenue, turn left onto 163 Street. Proceed south along 163 Street until you see the monument signs for the Chappelle Centre for Animal Care and the Animal Care & Control Centre.

When travelling eastbound on 137 Avenue, turn right onto 163 Street. Proceed south along 163 Street until you see the monument signs for the Chappelle Centre for Animal Care and the Animal Care & Control Centre.

For More Information

Animal Care & Control Centre

13550 - 163 Street
Edmonton, AB

Facility information and hours

Telephone

In Edmonton: 311

Outside Edmonton: 780-442-5311

Fax 780-496-8824
Email 311@edmonton.ca

End of page content. Please choose between the following five options:

Back to main menu Back to current page menu and content View current page breadcrumb Back to site search Continue to page footer content