Fire Prevention Week brings awareness to fire risks, striving to educate citizens about fire prevention including how to safely escape their home or building in the event of a fire.

Since 1992, the National Fire Protection Association (NFPA) has sponsored the public observance of Fire Prevention Week. Edmonton Fire Rescue Services has observed this week of awareness since 1931.   

Fire Prevention Week: October 3-9, 2021

This year, Edmonton Fire Rescue Services reminds Edmontonians to "learn the sounds of fire safety." Knowing what to do when an alarm sounds will keep you and your loved ones safe.

Hear a beep, get on your feet! A continuous set of loud beeps means smoke, fire or carbon monoxide. Leave the building immediately, get outside and call 9-1-1.

Hear a chirp, make a change! A single chirp every 30 or 60 seconds means that the battery is low and must be replaced. Chirping that continues after the battery has been replaced means that the alarm is at the end of its life and the entire alarm unit must be replaced with a new one.

Remember to test your alarms monthly! Press and hold the test button to make sure you hear the loud BEEP, BEEP, BEEP sound. If your alarm is more than 10 years old - it is time for a new one! 

Did you know that there are smoke alarms that use strobe lights to help wake up people who are hearing-impaired? Vibration notification applications (such as pillow or bed shakers) are also available to increase fire safety and notification of a fire. 

Learn the Sounds of Fire Safety

Smoke Alarms

Hear a beep, get on your feet! A continuous set of three, loud beeps means smoke or fire. Get out and call 911.

  • Install smoke alarms throughout your home, high up on a wall or ceiling.
  • Make sure everyone in the home can hear the smoke alarms.
  • Smoke alarms and alert devices (also known as accessories) are available for people who are deaf/hard of hearing or for those who are heavy sleepers. Strobe lights or pillow/bed shakers are also available.
  • Replace smoke alarm batteries at least once a year.
  • All smoke alarms must be replaced with a new smoke alarm after 10 years.
  • Never remove batteries or disable alarms.

A working smoke alarm is your first line of defence if there is a fire in your home. Learn more.

Carbon Monoxide Safety

Hear a chirp, make a change! A single chirp every 30 or 60 seconds means that the battery is low and must be replaced. Chirping that continues after the battery has been replaced means that the alarm is at the end of its life and the entire alarm unit must be replaced with a new one.

Carbon Monoxide (CO) is an odourless, colourless and toxic gas. Exposure to CO can cause symptoms such as dizziness, headache, nausea, fatigue, burning eyes, vomiting, and loss of muscle control.

  • Install CO alarms in a central location outside each sleeping room as well as on every level of the home.
  • Test CO alarms at least once a month and replace them according to the manufacturer's instructions.
  • Replace the CO alarm batteries once a year.
  • Never remove batteries or disable alarms.

Learn more.

Become Fire Safe

Practice Your Family's Home Safety Action Plan

Does your family have a Home Fire Safety Action Plan? Consider making the first Saturday of each month "Smoke Alarm Saturday" and remember to create a home fire escape plan and practice it at least twice a year. Download NFPA's  Home Safety Action Plan  and take some time to work through it with your family. 

Learn the Recipe for a Fire-Safe Kitchen

Do you know the recipe for fire safety? Take a peek at Edmonton Fire Rescue Services' Recipe for Home Fire Safety. Download it, print it off, and place it on the fridge for the whole family.

Reuse Disposable Coffee Cups

Edmonton Fire Rescue Services has partnered with local coffee shops to encourage citizens to take their coffee cups home and reuse them to collect cooking grease. Once the cup is full of solidified grease, dispose of the cup in the garbage. Never pour cooking grease down drains.

Partnering Coffee Shops:

How to Safely Cook with Oil and Grease

Between 2018 and 2019, Edmonton Fire Rescue Services responded to 153 fires caused by overheated cooking oil or grease. These fires were almost always caused by appliances being left unattended while in use. Learn how to safely put out one of these fires!

How to Make an Escape Plan

Seconds are critical during a fire! There is no time to stop and think about an escape route, so knowing what to do before a fire occurs can save your life. Making an escape plan and practicing it with your family is an essential part of fire safety.