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Answers to questions from the public about Edmonton's Residential Speeds Review.

Questions and Answers

How many fatalities have occurred in residential neighbourhoods within the City of Edmonton during the past 5 years? 10 years? Were these fatalities related to the speed at which vehicles were travelling, or were they due to pedestrian/biker error?

We engaged the City of Edmonton’s Urban Traffic Safety Research Chair at the University of Alberta, to assist us with identifying potential collision reductions that may be realized from reducing residential speed limits. To do this, research conducted on two recent Edmonton projects was considered: 

  • Implementation of playground zones where speed limits were lowered from 50 km to 30 km
  • 2009-2012 Speed Reduction Pilot Project where the speed limit in a number of neighbourhoods was reduced to 40 km
Do taxpayers have a say in this? Are there going to be town halls or input from us?

If you would like to share feedback, part of the Residential Speed Limits discussion will be the Non-Statutory Public Hearing, also taking place on Wednesday February 26, 2020 as part of the Community and Public Services Committee meeting. 

If you wish to speak at the Public Hearing, please visit edmonton.ca/meetings and fill in the Request to Speak form. You may also register to speak by calling the Office of the City Clerk at 780-496-8178. Please note that you may register to speak in person until the start of the meeting on February 26. If you require assistance, please contact the Office of the City Clerk. You may send your written comments to the Office of the City Clerk or by email to city.clerk@edmonton.ca or fax 780-496-8175. All written submissions will be available for public viewing at the Office of the City Clerk.
 

How do I give my input to the residential speed limit review?


If you would like to share feedback, part of the Residential Speed Limits discussion will be the Non-Statutory Public Hearing, also taking place on Wednesday February 26 as part of the Community and Public Services Committee meeting. 

If you wish to speak at the Public Hearing, please visit edmonton.ca/meetings and fill in the Request to Speak form. You may also register to speak by calling the Office of the City Clerk at 780-496-8178. Please note that you may register to speak in person until the start of the meeting on February 26. If you require assistance, please contact the Office of the City Clerk. You may send your written comments to the Office of the City Clerk or by email to city.clerk@edmonton.ca or fax 780-496-8175. All written submissions will be available for public viewing at the Office of the City Clerk.
City Council has directed Administration to consider speed limit reductions for residential areas, Main Streets and High Pedestrian Areas. 

If Council decides to move forward with new speed limits, the costs to implement new speed limit signs and deliver a robust public education and awareness campaign will be funded with funds generated from automated enforcement and will not be funded from tax levies. The City will bring forward cost estimates when they return to Community and Public Services Committee on February 26, 2020.  
 

I live in Red Deer & visit Edmonton often. If you change only a few area speed zones, how am I to know as a visitor what the speed limit is?

If Council decides to move forward with new speed limits, speed limit signs will be added or updated where required. This will include providing signs where speed limits transition from one to another. If a new city wide default speed limit is approved, signs will be placed at city limit entrances indicating the default speed limit. 

As well, if Council decides to move forward with any speed limit changes, an extensive, city-wide education campaign will take place.
 

Congestion due to narrow roadways would be alleviated in "mature" neighbourhoods if the city would also consider more one-way roads? Compare traffic in Highlands to Montrose to see one example.

Considering one way roads was not part of the direction from Council, so it was not included as part of this project.

However, our ETA tool demonstrates that in either approach to lower speed limits, trip times will not be greatly impacted and reducing speed limits will not impact congestion.
 

I live on a street that is a through road with a bus. If the smaller streets/avenues in my neighbourhood get lower speed limits, I'm worried that there will be more traffic on my street and I'll have trouble turning left.

The City completed a systematic road network review to identify where reduced speed limits could increase safety and liveability in Edmonton’s neighborhoods.

This location is considered a residential road and would be considered for potential speed limit reductions in either approach going to City Council:

  • A city-wide default speed limit of 40 km/h on residential roadways
  • A default speed limit of 30 km/h on residential roadways in high density neighbourhoods located in central Edmonton, which is being referred to as the Core Zone

If reduced speed limits are approved, the City will be working closely with Edmonton Police Service to implement a holistic enforcement approach, along with a public education and awareness campaign, to reinforce new driver expectations.
 

What data do you have to support that lowering speed limits will decrease the number of accidents?

The City engaged the Urban Traffic Safety Research Chair at the University of Alberta to review existing speed and collision data in order to model potential outcomes related to reducing residential speed limits. The analysis included estimating anticipated fatality, injury and property damage only collision reductions and quantifying the value of the social and economic cost avoidance related to decreasing collisions.

As part of the reports being presented to Community and Public Services Committee on Wednesday February 26, 2020, the full analysis and data will be provided for each speed reduction approach

To slow down traffic and improve safety in core and other neighbourhoods, why is "traffic calming" or speed bumps not being considered? Is it because they do not generate revenue from fines?

How fast people drive on our roads is influenced by a significant number of factors. Setting a target speed - or how fast we say is safe for people to be driving - is an important expectation to set and has a significant impact on driving behaviour.

Previous work and research has shown that reducing the speed limits alone can achieve reductions in vehicle travel speeds.
 

Has this been implemented anywhere? Have its benefits been proven by an independent party?

Several municipalities throughout Canada, the United States and worldwide have lowered, or are considering, reducing speed limits. Administration reviewed best practices, studies and research to develop our implementation plans. How we approach reducing speed limits is based on how our City is designed and our strategic goals, as outlined within ConnectEdmonton and the upcoming City Plan.  

The City engaged the Urban Traffic Safety Research Chair at the University of Alberta to review existing speed and collision data in order to model potential outcomes related to reducing residential speed limits. The analysis included estimating anticipated fatality, injury and property damage only collision reductions and quantifying the social and economic value of the cost avoidance related to decreasing collisions.

As part of the reports being presented to Community and Public Services Committee on February 26, 2020, the full analysis and data will be provided for each speed reduction approach. 
 

What are the estimated costs of all the new signage required to implement these speed reductions?

The City has developed a refreshed signage approach that will reduce the number of road signs on our streets wherever possible. The costs to implement new speed limit signs and deliver a robust public education and awareness campaign will be funded with funds generated from automated enforcement and will not be funded from tax levies. The City will bring forward cost estimates when they return to Committee in February 2020. 

How many incidents or fatalities have happened within the core area to justify these significant implementation costs like new speed limit signs and removal of the old when we are doing so many budget cuts?

Collision numbers will be included as part of the City’s presentation to Committee on the two approaches to speed limit reductions. The costs to implement new speed limit signs and to deliver a robust public education and awareness campaign will be funded with funds generated from automated enforcement and will not be funded from tax levies.

The City has developed a refreshed signage approach that will reduce the number of road signs on our streets wherever possible. Safe speeds are an important aspect of achieving Vision Zero goals through increased safety and livability. This will continue to be a priority for the City.

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Ask any question about Edmonton's residential speeds review and we'll do our best to find the answer and post it.

For More Information

Email saferoads@edmonton.ca

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