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The Public Parking Action Plan will modernize how curbside parking and other City-owned parking facilities are managed in Edmonton.

The plan will align the management of curbside parking and City-owned off-street parking assets with:

  • The recent removal of on-site parking minimums from the Zoning Bylaw, known as Open Option Parking
  • The direction of The City Plan to manage parking and curbside space as a strategic asset and develop a connected mobility system that supports a variety of transportation options for all Edmontonians
  • The City’s approach to reimagining how to best deliver services to Edmontonians in an efficient and effective way

 

Action Plan Development

Background Research

To inform the development of the Public Parking Action Plan, the City conducted a review of:

  • On-street parking and mobility policies within ConnectEdmonton and The City Plan
  • Current curbside parking programs, tools and tactics used in Edmonton, including Residential Parking Programs, time restricted parking and paid parking
  • Parking practices in other North American cities
  • Feedback shared about parking, mobility and transportation needs and other related topics from previous public engagement

 

Common Themes

Four themes emerged that were common across each area of background research. These important ‘cross-cutting themes’ provide the foundation for each of the actions identified in the Public Parking Action Plan.

Strategically manage municipal assets to maximize utilization for a variety of users and uses to achieve The City Plan.

The City owns and operates many parking assets, such as all curbside parking across the city, park and ride lots, and EPark zones. These assets need to be managed strategically to support The City Plan goals.

Develop a connected mobility system that supports all modes of transportation, and provides residents with convenient options.

Expanding the availability of, and City support for, a variety of transportation options, including bicycles, scooters and car-share, and ensuring these options are well-connected to each other will help diversify transportation options for Edmontonians in the years to come.  This includes expanding the way we think about transportation and how to leverage technology to support users.

Ensure the mobility system is accessible, safe, efficient, and barrier-free for all Edmontonians.

The City Plan envisions a well-connected city that is welcoming to people of all ages and varying mobility capacities. If we are to shift our transportation habits to include public transit use and more active transportation, such as bicycles, scooters, and walking, the City needs to be inclusive and ensure people of all ages, stages and mobility needs are accommodated.

Encourage modal shift by providing opportunities for transit or active transportation.

The City Plan identifies there is a need to diversify transportation options, such as expanding public transit and active transportation. This includes exploring how to use traditional curbside and other public parking spaces to support and encourage other forms of transportation.

Public Parking Actions

View the full Public Parking Action Plan

Action 1: Prioritize how public parking spaces should be programmed and utilized in alignment with the The City Plan and amend any relevant City of Edmonton policies, guidelines, bylaws, and design and construction standards to reflect this.

The City Plan provides strategic direction related to how Edmonton’s transportation network should be developed to build the kind of city we want now and into the future. This direction is supported by a set of guiding and regulatory documents that govern roadway design and management, such as the Complete Streets Guidelines, Main Streets Guidelines and Complete Streets Design and Construction Standards.

While these documents provide useful direction, there are gaps in guidance for how curbside space should be prioritized across different transportation modes, such as vehicles, bikes, transit and pedestrians. As Edmonton continues to develop and mature as an urban city, it will be important to accommodate traditional curbside uses, like vehicle-for-hire services, loading and accessible parking, as well as non-traditional curbside uses, like curbside drop-off, electric vehicles, car-sharing and temporary patios.

This action will include a thorough review of these existing documents to establish a prioritization matrix for determining when and where certain transportation modes or other uses should be prioritized within curbside spaces.

Cross-cutting Themes

Theme 1 IconStrategically manage municipal assets to maximize utilization for a variety of users and uses to achieve The City Plan.

 

Theme 3 IconEnsure the mobility system is accessible, safe, efficient, and barrier-free for all Edmontonians.

 

Theme 4 IconEncourage modal shift by providing opportunities for transit or active transportation.

Action 2: Align the current public parking pricing framework to The City Plan policy directions.

Managing and maintaining public parking spaces, which includes curbside parking and other City-owned parking facilities, is an ongoing expense for the City. While hourly parking revenues are one way to help recoup costs, these revenues largely do not cover the total upkeep and maintenance required for all public parking spaces in the city. The City needs to explore additional opportunities for public parking revenue generation and subsidization in order to more strategically manage these spaces as a municipal asset. 

This action will include reviewing:

  • Existing fees charged to builders, developers and businesses for permits to use curbside space, such as temporary parking permits, On Street Construction and Maintenance (OSCAM) Permits and vending permits, and exploring whether fees need to be adjusted to ensure effective use of curbside spaces.
  • Where and when the City charges Edmontonians for public curbside parking and how much is charged. This will include looking at the impacts of COVID-19 and other factors on curbside parking demand, how changes in demand should inform parking rate increases or decreases, as well as a review of the relationship between parking and transit rates in support of mode shift.

Cross-cutting Themes

Theme 1 IconStrategically manage municipal assets to maximize utilization for a variety of users and uses to achieve The City Plan.

 

Theme 2 IconDevelop a connected mobility system that supports all modes of transportation and provides residents with convenient options.

 

Theme 3 IconEnsure the mobility system is accessible, safe, efficient, barrier-free for all Edmontonians

 

Theme 4 IconEncourage modal shift by providing opportunities for transit or active transportation.

Action 3: Explore opportunities to enhance active transportation amenities in public and private developments.

The City Plan identifies a clear need and direction to encourage the use of active transportation and public transit networks.

The inclusion of ‘end-to-end’ amenities like safe and secure bicycle storage, personal lockers, showers and washrooms are key tools in encouraging greater use of active and public transportation networks. Providing these amenities may also reduce the need for on-site parking at businesses and residential developments, thereby encouraging more efficient use of that land which supports the move towards a more compact and walkable city.

This action will look at how the City can adjust its policies and regulations to enable more and better transportation amenities in the transportation network.

Cross-cutting Themes

Theme 1 IconStrategically manage municipal assets to maximize utilization for a variety of users and uses to achieve The City Plan.

 

Theme 2 IconDevelop a connected mobility system that supports all modes of transportation and provides residents with convenient options.

 

Theme 3 IconEnsure the mobility system is accessible, safe, efficient, barrier-free for all Edmontonians

 

Theme 4 IconEncourage modal shift by providing opportunities for transit or active transportation.

Action 4: Leverage technology to strategically manage parking assets and improve customer experiences.

This action will involve reviewing and improving the existing tools the City uses to educate and share information about parking in Edmonton and manage public parking spaces. An exploration of best practices in other cities and new, leading technologies will be key.

This may include improvements to the EPark paid parking system and automated enforcement, opportunities to better integrate parking, active transportation and transit management tools, and enhancing the City’s current wayfinding and educational materials. 

Cross-cutting Themes

Theme 1 IconStrategically manage municipal assets to maximize utilization for a variety of users and uses to achieve The City Plan.

 

Theme 2 IconDevelop a connected mobility system that supports all modes of transportation and provides residents with convenient options

 

Theme 3 IconEnsure the mobility system is accessible, safe, efficient, barrier-free for all Edmontonians

 

Theme 4 IconEncourage modal shift by providing opportunities for transit or active transportation.

Action 5: Explore opportunities to allocate parking revenues in support of local businesses and communities, active transportation and public transit.

When parking is paid for at a City-owned parking meter, the fares help pay for the maintenance of public infrastructure. A community benefit model of paid parking presents opportunities to leverage increased parking fees in specific areas to support local businesses and communities, district improvements and/or related city-building activities. Such improvements may include enhanced sidewalk amenities like benches and lighting, new bike lanes, park space activation, and public art.

Cross-cutting Themes

Strategically manage municipal assets to maximize utilization.Strategically manage municipal assets to maximize utilization for a variety of users and uses to achieve The City Plan.

 

Encouraging modal shift for transit and active transportation.Encourage modal shift by providing opportunities for transit or active transportation.

Action 6: Implement actions as outlined in the Designated Curbside Accessible Project Implementation Plan in fulfillment of Council Policy C602: Accessibility for People with Disabilities.

The City Plan envisions a well-connected city that is welcoming to people of all ages and varying mobility capacities. While the use of active and public transportation is encouraged, this may not be practical for all Edmontonians, especially those who may have mobility needs that would be best supported by designated accessible curbside parking spaces.

To support these needs, designated accessible curbside parking spaces should be located and designed to best support those in need of these spaces. Council Policy C602: Accessibility for People with Disabilities and the Complete Streets Design and Construction Standards will be used to help improve accessible curbside parking spaces. 

This may include the positioning of curbside parking spaces on the near and far sides of intersections where sidewalk ramps exist, or improving the demarcation and visibility of designated accessible parking spaces for easier acquisition. Universal design recommendations will also be made for new infrastructure and renewal projects.

Cross-cutting Themes

Theme 1 IconStrategically manage municipal assets to maximize utilization for a variety of users and uses to achieve The City Plan.

 

Theme 3 Icon Ensure the mobility system is accessible, safe, efficient, and barrier-free for all Edmontonians.

Action 7: Replace the existing Residential Parking Permit program with a modernized program that balances congestion management and broader city-building goals identified in The City Plan.

The City currently uses several approaches to managing curbside spaces, including the Residential Parking Permit program. This program restricts parking in residential areas based on specific criteria, like the type of building (eg. residential or commercial).

Given that this program was last updated in 1998, it’s time to modernize the program to align it with the new city-building goals established in The City Plan. This action may include updating the eligibility criteria for the program, reviewing parking permit fees, and consideration of non-residential applications of the program.

Cross-cutting Themes

Theme 1 IconStrategically manage municipal assets to maximize utilization for a variety of users and uses to achieve The City Plan.

 

Theme 4 IconEncourage modal shift by providing opportunities for transit or active transportation.

Next Steps

The action plan is targeted to go to the Urban Planning Committee for review and feedback in May 2021. Following review and feedback by the Urban Planning Committee, the City will outline an implementation plan. Implementation will be gradual, with actions being rolled out over the next 3 to 5 years.  

Public Engagement

An extensive review of previously-published public engagement reports containing feedback about parking preferences, priorities and their associated trade-offs, on-street parking, mobility needs and other relevant city-building considerations helped to inform the actions in the Public Parking Action Plan.

This approach aligns with the City’s direction to use The City Plan as a guiding document, leverage previous engagement data to inform decision-making, and be more efficient in our operations. Edmontonians can share their views on the action plan directly with members of Council by registering to speak when the action plan advances to the Urban Planning Committee in May 2021 for review and feedback.

Opportunities for public participation and engagement on specific actions will be assessed as part of the forthcoming implementation plan.

Timeline

Spring 2021

Following review and feedback by the Urban Planning Committee, the City will outline an implementation plan. Implementation will be gradual, with actions being rolled out over the next 3 to 5 years.  

Spring 2021

Public Parking Action Plan targeted to go to the Urban Planning Committee for review and feedback in May 2021.

Fall 2020 - Winter 2021

Background research was undertaken to inform the development of the Public Parking Action Plan. This included a review of current on-street parking policies and programs, on-street parking practices in other North American municipalities, and feedback shared about parking, mobility and transportation needs and related topics from prior public engagement. Four common themes emerged from the research that provided the foundation for each of the actions identified in the Public Parking Action Plan.

Summer 2020

City Council approved the removal of minimum on-site parking requirements for new homes and businesses from the Zoning Bylaw, known as Open Option Parking.

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