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Property Information on Edmonton Maps

What property information is available on Edmonton Maps?

The City has recently made changes to Edmonton Maps, and you may notice some assessment data fields are no longer being displayed.

These changes have been made to align the data presented through Edmonton Maps to the data available through the City’s Open Data catalogue.

Personal property data formerly provided on Edmonton Maps was collected by the City specifically for assessment purposes. This data was subsequently shared through the website with a disclaimer that homeowners could compare their properties’ assessment to those of their neighbours. Through the Open Data review process, it came to the City’s attention that information on Edmonton Maps was being used for non-assessment related purposes.

The City of Edmonton is committed to the privacy of individual property owners and is legislatively obligated to collect and distribute information for assessment purposes only. The City is currently working on alternative methods for a home owner to access the property information previously available, but this will be behind a password-protected site with a number of additional controls in place.

Property Values and Assessment Notice

Why am I receiving my assessment notice in January?

Receiving your assessment notice at the beginning of the year gives you the opportunity to review your property's assessed value, contact us if you have any questions and plan for your next property tax payment.

What should I do if I have not received my assessment notice?

The City starts mailing assessment notices to all property owners the first work day of January.

If you have not received your notice by the end of the second week in January, please call 311 and we will have another notice issued.

If you purchased a property between November 15 and December 31, you should receive your assessment notice by January 18. If not, fill out and submit the Request for Assessment Notice Reprint or Password form.

I just purchased my property. Why is the property assessment higher than the price I paid?

The Government of Alberta legislates that the City must assess all property within Edmonton every year using a mass appraisal approach. The assessed value of your property as indicated in your latest assessment notice is your property’s market value—the amount it would have sold for based on mass appraisal in the open market—on July 1 of the previous year.

To establish an assessed value of your property, the City uses information on real estate sales that occurred up to and including last July 1 and information on any physical changes recorded up to last December 31.

Real estate market may, and often does, change between the time the City determines assessment values and the time you purchase your property.

Depending on the time of the year you purchased your property, the sale price could be either higher or lower than the assessment. 

Typically, the assessed value is within 10% of the purchase price.

Watch: Property Assessments Explained Using Fun, Visual Aids

The information for my property is incorrect on the website. How do I get this information corrected?

If you’ve come across an error in your assessment notice, contact us first.

Most assessment-related concerns can be resolved by speaking with a 311 agent or assessor—with no formal complaint fees required.

To help us address your concerns more effectively, have your latest assessment notice in front of you with the "account" number and "valuation group" information ready.

It is important that you contact us as quickly as possible so that we can make any necessary corrections. 

 

What if the size of my home, as indicated on the City's secure website, is wrong?

Measurements used for assessment purposes reflect exterior measurements and may differ from what your builder has stated.  

If you believe that incorrect measurements have been used to calculate your assessment, please contact us.

I filed an assessment complaint last year and received a reduction in my assessment from the Assessment Review Board. Why isn't that reduction reflected in my new assessment?

According to provincial legislation, the City of Edmonton determines market values of all properties within Edmonton as of July 1 by taking into account attributes that affect market value at that time and the condition of the property as of December 31.

If the Assessment Review Board reduction was not reflective of the condition of the property as of December 31, then it will not be reflected in the new assessment. For example, if the Assessment Review Board reduced the property assessment because the basement foundation had collapsed, the same reduction would not apply if the foundation was repaired by December 31.

Also, each year is treated as a new year: if the Assessment Review Board reduces a property one year, it does not necessarily mean that the same reduction would apply the next as market conditions change.

Why is my property assessed as being complete, when the building is unfinished?

The annual assessment notice reflects the condition of your property as of December 31 of last year. 

If your property was mistakenly assessed as being 100% complete as of December 31, contact us to have this information reviewed and corrected if warranted.

My home was still under construction at the end of last year. How are these types of properties assessed?

Annual property assessment notices reflect the status and physical condition of property (what structures and finish the building had) as of December 31 of the year prior to the taxation year.

If your property was only partially complete as of December 31, your assessment notice will reflect the value of the land plus the value of the building, based on its completion percentage.

The City will issue a supplementary property assessment notice that will indicate the amount your property assessment has increased as a result of new construction.

Your supplementary assessment notice will also show the number of supplementary months (months your property was completed or occupied). Your supplementary property tax notice will indicate the additional amount of property taxes you are required to pay this taxation year.

To learn more about the City's supplementary assessment process, watch this video: What is a supplementary assessment?

My property has a building on it. Why does my property assessment show my property as vacant?

The property assessment reflects the physical characteristics and attributes of your property as of December 31 of the previous year. If the building was added after this date, the assessment records show the property as vacant. 

If your property was only partially complete as of December 31, your assessment notice will reflect the value of the land plus the value of the building, based on its completion percentage.  

The City will issue a supplementary assessment notice that will reflect the value of newly completed construction.

The addition of the building will be reflected on next year's property assessment notice.


My neighbour's property has been renovated. Why is his assessment similar to mine?

Please contact us. Any information such as this, provided by a third party, will have to be verified by the City’s assessor. A site inspection of the subject property, as well as others in the area, will be conducted to ensure that the correct data have been used to determine the assessed values.  

What is a “re-inspection neighbourhood"?

All properties in Edmonton are re-inspected for assessment purposes periodically, in accordance with international assessment standards. These re-inspections ensure that all property-related information the City has on file is as current as possible. 

As the City cannot reinspect 300+ neighbourhoods at once, we select a number of Edmonton communities each year for assessment re-inspection. 

These communities are called re-inspection neighbourhoods.

What effect, if any, do re-inspections have on assessments?

A re-inspection of a property will result in assessment changes if there is a change in the property that affects value (for example, a new garage, renovations or additions to the home).

Any changes to the assessment of the re-inspected property will typically be reflected in the tax year after the re-inspection was conducted.

Property Taxes

Is this a property tax bill?

No. Your property tax bill will be mailed to you at the end of May.

What is the "estimated taxes" amount shown on my assessment notice?

Your assessment notice offers a property tax estimate. This estimate is provided for information purposes only with the intention to help you budget for your next property tax bill.

The estimate is calculated by using last year’s provincial education and municipal budgets and current assessed value of your property. Due to process limitations, when you receive your assessment notice in January, this estimate does not include any budget decisions made by City Council in December nor any local improvement fees you may be required to pay.

Your actual property tax is known only when the final City budget is approved in April and the provincial education tax is known. This amount is stated on your property tax notice, which arrives in May.

If you wish to plan for your property tax payment, we encourage you to use our online tax estimator and consider enrolling in our property tax monthly payment plan.

Senior citizens may be eligible to defer all or part of their property taxes through the Senior Property Tax Deferral Program. For information on the Senior Property Tax Deferral Program, call the Government of Alberta at 780-644-9992.

How does property assessment correlate to property taxes?

To ensure all Edmonton property owners pay their fair share of municipal and provincial education property taxes, the City uses a property assessment process as legislated by the provincial government.

Your current assessment notice indicates your property’s market value—the amount it would have sold for in the open market—on July 1 of the previous year. All properties are assessed using similar factors that real estate agents and appraisers use when pricing a home for sale. This market value is then used to calculate the amount of taxes you pay in proportion to the value of the real estate you own.

Watch: Property Assessments Explained Using Fun, Visual Aids.

My property assessment decreased. Will my taxes decrease?

Overall, change in property assessments affects property taxes in the following manner:

Average assessed value increase = Average municipal tax increase

If your property’s value increase is similar to the average, city-wide assessed value increase, you will see a tax increase that is similar to the average municipal tax increase  (3.4%, as set by Council in December 2015).

Higher than average assessment value increase = Higher than average municipal tax increase

If your property’s assessed value increased by more than the average assessed value increase, you will see a greater than the average municipal tax increase.

Lower than average assessment value increase = Lower than average municipal tax increase

If your property’s assessed value increased by less than the average assessed value increase,you will see a tax increase that is less than the average municipal tax increase.

Through the property assessment process, the City determine the market value of your property. This market value is used to calculate the amount of taxes you pay in proportion to the value of the real estate you own.

The City does not get extra revenue when overall property assessments increase nor does the City receive less revenue when overall property assessments decrease.

Estimate: Property taxes.

Watch: Property Assessments Explained Using Fun, Visual Aids.

Property Owner Representative Authorization

When am I required to submit the property owner representative authorization?

The City of Edmonton is legislated to release property information only to property owners.

If you would like a representative to contact the City about your property’s assessment on your behalf, you must appoint a property owner representative (agent) by submitting the City’s Agent/Representative Authorization form.

This authorization is legally binding only for one year.

Who is allowed to have full access to property information?

According to legislation, the City of Edmonton can release property information to a property owner or a property owner representative (agent) appointed directly by the property owner.

An authorized property owner representative, or agent, is “a person authorized by another (principal) to act for or in place of him; one entrusted (sic) with another’s business.” 

In the assessment context, property owners can appoint any other person they want as an agent, including an employee, husband, wife or child.

While City assessors do not typically discuss financial details when dealing with a residential property, Alberta’s Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act still requires the City to protect such items as the mailing address of a property owner or the school support declaration. 

In addition, it is impossible for a municipality to agree to anything about the assessment with a party that is not the property owner or his/her duly appointed agent. Therefore, any discussion about attempting to correct an assessment on a residential property cannot be completed without the involvement of the property owner or their agent.

This authorization is legally binding only for one year.

Can I delegate my spouse to deal with the City about our assessment?

The agent/representative authorization process applies to all “types” of property owners, including residential property owners. 

For example, if the wife is the title holder, she still must appoint her husband to act as an agent on her behalf even if he lives on the property.  

Remember that this authorization is legally binding only for one year.

Can I delegate my employee to deal with issues regarding my property’s assessment?

Yes. The agent/representative authorization process applies to all “types” of property owners, including non-residential and commercial property owners.

For example, corporations can appoint employees or property management companies to deal with any issues relating to property assessment. 

Remember that this authorization is legally binding only for one year.

How long does it take for the City to process the authorization?

Authorization forms are usually validated within three to five business days.

Why am I required to appoint a property owner representative every year?

The City implements the property owner agent/representative authorization process on a yearly basis for several reasons. 

First, property owners are not legally obligated to inform the City about changes to their marital status, family arrangements, employees, corporate structure or which property management company represents them.  It is important for property owners to reaffirm to the City, on a yearly basis, that an agent is still acting on their behalf. 

Second, this yearly process also allows the City to keep updated records as to who is representing a property owner to ensure that there are no inadvertent breaches of Alberta’s Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act when a property owner does not tell the City that an agent from the prior year no longer represents them.

Finally,  the City has experienced various attempts to obtain confidential information about a property. For example: 

  • A husband who was going through a divorce attempting to find the current mailing address of his wife with intent to use that address for illicit purposes.
  • An ex-employee of a corporation attempting to obtain financial data about the corporation he/she no longer works for.
  • Agents that had acted for property owners in a prior year claiming they were still the agents when property owners stated that they had no agents.
  • Multiple employees of the same corporation appointing agents for the same property. This situation creates uncertainty about who the City should deal with in relation to the property.

Each of these examples demonstrates that the agent/representative authorization process is designed to will stop breaches of Alberta’s Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act. 

Why does the City have this process in place?

In order to ensure that the City of Edmonton is fully compliant with the spirit and intent of Alberta’s Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act, property owners must submit an Agent/Representative Authorization form in order to appoint an agent/representative to deal with the City on their behalf.

When City assessors discuss the assessment of a property, it is common for them to discuss the rental rate on the property or other financial information associated with a property.

Actual financial information about a property is considered to be confidential information under Alberta’s Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act and, therefore, cannot be released or discussed with anyone except for the property owners or their duly appointed agent. 

If such a process is not followed, the City may inadvertently release information about a property to someone who, for example, turns out to be a competitor of the property owner, resulting in harm to his or her business.


For More Information

Assessment Information

If you have in-person inquiries, visit us at the Edmonton Service Centre:

10111 104 Avenue NW
Edmonton, Alberta T5J 0J4

Telephone In Edmonton: 311
Outside Edmonton: 780-442-5311
TTY 780-944-5555
Email assessment@edmonton.ca

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