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The Canadian, provincial and municipal flags are symbols of honour and pride for all Canadians. Proper consideration and etiquette should be maintained.

Half-Masting

Flags at half mast

Flags on City buildings and spaces may be lowered to half-mast to commemorate special dates such as Remembrance Day, as a measure of respect and condolence when a high profile official passes away or as per protocol recommendation.

A flag is generally half-masted until sunset on the day of the funeral or memorial, unless other arrangements have been specified.

Annual half-masts include:

  • April 9, National Day of Remembrance of the Battle of Vimy Ridge: Flags at City Hall are lowered to half-mast 
  • April 28, National Day of Mourning: Flags on all municipal buildings are lowered to half-mast for those who have suffered and died in the workplace
  • June 23, National Day of Remembrance for Victims of Terrorism: Flags at City Hall are lowered to half-mast
  • Second Sunday in September, Firefighters' National Memorial Day: Flags at City Hall and municipal fire stations are lowered to half-mast
  • Last Sunday in September, Police and Peace Officers National Memorial Day: Flags at City Hall and municipal police stations are lowered to half-mast 
  • November 11, Remembrance Day: Flags on all municipal buildings are lowered to half-mast from 11am to sunset
  • December 6, National Day of Remembrance and Action on Violence Against Women: Flags at City Hall are lowered to half-mast

Position of Honour

Flying the Flag

The location of the position of honour depends on the number of flags flown. When two flags (or more than three flags) are displayed, the position of honour is furthest to the left. To an observer facing the display, the Canadian flag should be on the left and the City flag on the right. 

When three flags are flown, the position of honour is in the centre. From the perspective of the audience facing the flags, the Canadian flag should be placed in the centre, the Provincial flag on the left and the City flag on the right.

The Canadian flag should not be flown on the same flag pole as any other flag, according to Heritage Canada.  It should not be subjected to indignity or displayed in a position inferior to any other flag.

Precedence

The order of precedence for flags is:

  1. The National Flag of Canada
  2. The flags of other sovereign nations in alphabetical order.
  3. The flags of the provinces of Canada (in the order in which they joined Confederation)
  4. The flags of the territories of Canada (in the order in which they joined Confederation)
  5. The flags of municipalities/cities
  6. Banners of organizations
  7. Historical Flags

When there are more than three flagpoles, the National Flag of Canada should be flown on the left of the observer facing the flags. An additional National Flag of Canada may be displayed at the end of the line if desired.

City Hall Flag Specifications

The Canadian flag, Provincial flag, the City of Edmonton flag, Treaty 6 flag, and Metis flag are flown on the official flag poles in front of City Hall.

These flags are 3 feet by 6 feet or 0.90 by 1.80 metres.

More information about flag etiquette is available on the Canadian Heritage website.

For More Information

Protocol Office

Email protocol@edmonton.ca

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